Samyang, also known as Rokinon, has announced four new XEEN cinema lenses, including three T1.3 ‘Meister’ primes and a single 2x anamorphic lens.

XEEN 35mm, 50mm and 85mm T1.3 ‘Meister’ primes

The three XEEN ‘Meister’ primes are designed for cameras with up to 8K resolution and feature Samyang’s proprietary X-coating technology. The lenses are color-matched across the entire ‘Meister’ range and all offer the same T1.3 apertures with a 13-blade aperture diaphragm. Each of the lenses also have a 300º rotation angle for the geared focus ring, a 92º rotation for the aperture ring, a 114mm front filter thread and measure 127mm in diameter so filters, follow focus systems and other accessories work across the entire lineup.

The lenses are available for Canon EF, PL and Sony E mount camera systems. The PL mount versions include the I Technology protocol for recording lens metadata, including focal length, aperture and focus distance. All of the lenses feature a carbon fiber and metal construction with luminescent aperture and focus marks for easier viewing in dim environments.

XEEN 50mm T2.3 2x Anamorphic

Alongside the three ‘Meister’ primes, Samyang also revealed the details of its new 50mm T2.3 2x anamorphic lens for full-frame sensors.

As with its ‘Meister’ companions, the 50mm T2.3 2x anamorphic lens is constructed of carbon fiber and metal. It also offers the same 114mm front filter thread, is 128mm in diameter and uses the same 300º rotation angle for the focus ring. The aperture ring, however, is just 89.5º, 2.5º shorter than the primes, which have a faster maximum aperture.

After footage has been de-squeezed, the PL-mount XEEN Anamorphic lens covers 2.55:1 CinemaScope format. Other features include a 15-blade aperture diaphragm, luminescent paint markers for aperture and focus and a minimum focusing distance of one meter (3.3ft).

No pricing or availability information has been provided at this time for any of the lenses. We have contacted Samyang for details regarding pricing and release dates.

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